NIH research grants yield economic windfall

US President Donald Trump wants to gut government funding for biomedical research, but an analysis suggests that projects backed by the country's National Institutes of Health (NIH) have much broader economic benefits than suspected. Between 1980 and 2007, 8.4% of NIH grants led directly to a patent, researchers report today in Science.

US President Donald Trump wants to gut government funding for biomedical research, but an analysis suggests that projects backed by the country's National Institutes of Health (NIH) have much broader economic benefits than suspected. Between 1980 and 2007, 8.4% of NIH grants led directly to a patent, researchers report today in Science. (Image: Tim Boyle/Bloomberg/Getty)

The Trump Administration's budget outline for fiscal year 2018—America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again—is frustratingly short on details. But its strike against the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has mobilized both biomedical research advocates and members of Congress.

Related: Research advocates ramp up response to Trump's proposed NIH cuts

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