Single-photon counting

Princeton Lightwave (Cranbury, NJ) and id Quantique (Geneva, Switzerland) have developed the first single-photon counting module optimized for 1064 nm by combining an optimized avalanche photodiode with integrated biasing and quenching electronics.

Princeton Lightwave (Cranbury, NJ) and id Quantique (Geneva, Switzerland) have developed the first single-photon counting module optimized for 1064 nm by combining an optimized avalanche photodiode with integrated biasing and quenching electronics.

Princeton Lightwave's expertise in III-V single-photon detector design and fabrication was used to develop the InGaAsP/InP avalanche photodiode optimized for Geiger mode operation with high-efficiency at 1064 nm. id Quantique combined this photodiode with its integrated active quenching circuit, which guarantees high performance, thanks to fast quenching and low capacitance, and high reliability. The detector module is intended for applications in spectroscopy, free space quantum key distribution, and remote sensing.

idquantique
Princeton Lightwave


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