High-speed OCT imaging software from Michelson Diagnostics

New software enables high-speed imaging--up to 40 frames per second--for the EX1301 optical coherence tomography (OCT) microscope from Michelson Diagnostics Ltd. (MDL, Orpington, UK). The new capability enables OCT imaging of dynamic processes such as the heartbeat of a fruit fly.

New software enables high-speed imaging--up to 40 frames per second--for the EX1301 optical coherence tomography (OCT) microscope from Michelson Diagnostics Ltd. (MDL, Orpington, UK). The new capability enables OCT imaging of dynamic processes such as the heartbeat of a fruit fly.

The updated software is four times faster than the previous version, and was originally developed for Michelson's hand-held OCT scanner, which is due for launch in late spring/early summer 2009. Actual frame rates depend on the image width: from 7.5 fps (1250 pixels wide), to 40 fps (125 pixels wide).

For further information, including details on the EX1301 OCT microscope, please visit the MDL web site.

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original press release from Michelson Diagnostics Ltd

Michelson Diagnostics Announces High Speed OCT Imaging Software
Orpington, UK, May 2009: Michelson Diagnostics (MDL) has announced new high speed imaging capability for its EX1301 OCT Microscope. OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) images can be captured at up to 40 frames per second, enabling imaging of dynamic processes such as the heartbeat of a fruit-fly.

"We believe that this capability will prove very useful for biologists, for example those who are researching the genetic origins of heart disease", said Jon Holmes, MDL's CEO, "The high frame rate, coupled with market-leading optical resolution from our patented Multi-Beam OCT optics, in an off-the-shelf package, will open up new opportunities for the developmental biology scientist"

The new high-speed processing software is four times faster than the previous version, and was originally developed for MDL's new hand-held OCT scanner, which is due for launch in late spring/early summer 2009. Actual frame rates depend on the image width: from 7.5 fps (image width 1,250 pixels), to 40 fps (image width 125 pixels).

For further details, please visit the MDL web site, www.michelsondiagnostics.com or email your questions to enquiries@md-ltd.co.uk.

Posted by Barbara G. Goode, barbarag@pennwell.com, for BioOptics World.

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