LensAR ophthalmology laser system receives FDA approval for five new utilities

LensAR has received FDA clearance for five new utilities integrated into its femtosecond laser system for ophthalmology.

Content Dam Bow Online Articles 2015 April Lensarandcassini Highres Web

Femtosecond ophthalmology laser technology developer LensAR (Orlando, FL) has received FDA clearance for a suite of five new application technologies integrated into the company's LensAR Laser System. The system, which includes the company's Streamline technology, is a femtosecond laser cataract platform that enables automation of several surgical procedure planning and execution elements with the introduction of five new application upgrades.

The system can establish a wireless integration protocol with preoperative diagnostic devices. The company is initiating this capability with the Cassini Corneal Shape Analyzer, enabling the wireless transfer of data from preoperative corneal measurements to the system. This new integration eliminates potential errors that can occur from manual entry of data from the device used in the preoperative and surgical planning process. Integration with Cassini enables the capture of preoperative iris registration data and maps it to the image of the eye obtained under the laser at procedure time, eliminating the need to manually ink-mark the eye to identify and adjust for the cyclorotation that may occur when a patient is reclined during surgery.

Content Dam Bow Online Articles 2015 April Lensarandcassini Highres Web
The LensAR Laser System with Streamline technology is a femtosecond laser cataract platform that enables automation of several surgical procedure planning and execution elements with the introduction of five new application upgrades. (Photo: Business Wire)

Additionally, surgeons have access to an arcuate incision planning table on the laser that includes parameters to define the location, depth, and extent of the surgeon's intended arcuate incisions based on individual patient biometric measurements and other factors defined by the surgeon. The arcuate incision planning capability allows surgeons to retain their plan preferences for later use, increasing surgical operating room efficiency.

The Streamline upgrades also introduce integrated cataract density imaging, which automatically categorizes the cataract to a pre-programmed, surgeon-customized fragmentation pattern depending upon the density of the cataract and allows the surgeon to automatically isolate fragmentation to the nucleus. This first-in-market innovation may have a positive impact on efficiency and procedure time.

Streamline upgrades, including the arcuate incision planning, cataract density imaging, and customized fragmentation patterns, will be made available to all system users. The full Streamline technology suite will be available to practices currently using both the system and the Cassini analyzer.

The company will be demonstrating the system with Streamline at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Annual Meeting (ASCRS), to take place April 18-20, 2015, in San Diego, CA (booth #1750). For more information, please visit www.lensar.com/ascrs2015.

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