Ikonisys reports commercialization milestones with oncoFISH cervical cancer test

JANUARY 15, 2009--Ikonisys, Inc. says it has made two milestones in commercializing oncoFISH, its fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test for cervical cancer, which launched in September 2008. New York State certification now allows Ikonisys to offer the test to New York State customers through the CAP accredited, fully licensed clinical laboratory. In addition, Ikonisys has signed its first customer, New England Pathology Associates.

JANUARY 15, 2009--Ikonisys, Inc. says it has achieved two milestones in the commercialization of oncoFISH, its fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test for cervical cancer, which launched in September 2008. Ikonisys has now received New York State certification allowing the company to offer it to New York State customers through the state's CAP accredited, fully licensed clinical laboratory. In addition, Ikonisys has signed its first customer, New England Pathology Associates, P.C., which will offer the test to physicians. The test will be performed at the Ikonisys Clinical Laboratory located in New Haven, CT.

"Until now, physicians had no tool to help assess cervical disease risk for women diagnosed with low grade squamous lesions. oncoFISH cervical is an advancement in risk stratification, which will result in improved patient management for a woman diagnosed with an abnormal Pap. We are pleased to be the first to offer oncoFISH cervical to our physicians," said Dr. Bruce Dziura, Chief of Cytopathology of New England Pathology Associates at Mercy Medical Center, Springfield. Mass.

oncoFISH cervical helps determine the acquisition of specific chromosomal aberrations in cytological specimens. It provides physicians with additional information that can assist them in making more informed clinical management decisions. The laboratory-developed test is intended to be run subsequent to a Pap smear in patients identified to have Low Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (LSIL). Test results can be used as a differentiator for medical professionals seeking to identify which patients may regress or progress to cervical cancer. Based on this information, physicians and patients can work together to develop early, personalized treatment plans that better address individual needs and ultimately increase chances of survival.

More information:
Ikonisys, Inc.

Posted by Barbara G. Goode, barbarag@pennwell.com.

More in Biomedicine