RightEye test uses NIR illumination to help determine head trauma severity quickly

A concussion test uses near-infrared light to illuminate the eyes and advanced sensors (a camera) to take rapid images.

Content Dam Bow Online Articles 2015 October Workstation 4 2

Medical device maker RightEye (Bethesda, MD) has launched its RightEye Neuro Vision concussion test that helps healthcare providers more clearly understand the severity of a patient’s head trauma and better assess their recovery over time. The test's eye tracking technology uses near-infrared light to illuminate the eyes and advanced sensors (a camera) to take rapid images of the eyes.

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The eye-tracked, digital test is based on the smooth pursuit protocol, which is a manual concussion test used by physicians to determine if a person’s eyes are able to closely follow a moving object. The company has taken this subjective manual examination that requires observation of the patient’s eyes and has created a 15 s test that is objective, repeatable, and comparable over time, and lets healthcare providers discover more about an individual’s health.

The patient, while sitting in front of a computer that has a small eye tracking bar attached at the bottom of the screen, simply watches a circular digital animation for 15 s. Immediately following the test, the system automatically e-mails a report to the healthcare provider and patient that shows the eye-tracked digitization of the results and associated metrics.

Content Dam Bow Online Articles 2015 October Workstation 4 2

The device, which was showcased at the 2015 American Academy of Optometry (AAO) meeting held October 7-10, 2015, in New Orleans, LA, is delivered in a portable hardware package with a web-based software interface, and ranges from $595 to $995 on a monthly licensing basis.

IMG Academy (Bradenton, FL), a sports training center that serves pre-professional baseball players, plans to use the device to measure how quickly a batter can see and then react to the spin of a baseball.

For more information, please visit www.righteye.com.

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