Low-level laser therapy reduces unsightly upper-arm flab

Recent study findings reported at the annual meeting of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery confirmed that low-level laser therapy produced a significant reduction in upper arm circumference in a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study of 62 patients.

Recent study findings reported at the annual meeting of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (October 11-14, 2012, in Atlanta, GA) confirmed that low-level laser therapy produced a significant reduction in upper arm circumference in a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study of 62 patients.1

In the study, led by Mark S. Nestor, MD, Ph.D., director of the Center for Cosmetic Enhancement (Miami, FL) and the Center for Clinical and Cosmetic Research (Aventura, FL), the researchers used the Zerona laser scanner from Erchonia (McKinney, TX), which consists of five independent red laser diodes emitting 17 mW of 635 nm light in overlapping patterns. A total of 3.94 J/cm2 of energy was delivered during each treatment.

Overall reduction in upper arm circumference of at least 1.25 cm was achieved in 58% of 31 patients randomized to receive three 20-minute treatments each week for two weeks, compared with 3% of 31 patients randomized to receive sham treatments, reported Nestor. Also, more subjects in the treatment group than in the control group reported satisfaction with the results (65% vs. 22%), improved appearance (81% vs. 26%), and results that exceeded expectations (45% vs. 17%).

The Zerona laser scanner was FDA-approved in 2010 as a noninvasive body contouring therapy for reducing hip, waist, and thigh circumference.

1. M. S. Nestor, M. B. Zarraga, and H. Park, J. Clin. Aesthet. Dermatol., 5, 2, 42–48 (February 2012).

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