OCT shows promise for pancreatic cancer diagnosis

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital, Physical Sciences, Inc., Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Brandeis University have demonstrated for the first time that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can reliably distinguish between pancreatic cysts that are low- and high-risk for becoming malignant.

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital, Physical Sciences, Inc., Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Brandeis University (all of Boston, MA) have demonstrated for the first time that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can reliably distinguish between pancreatic cysts that are low- and high-risk for becoming malignant.

To test the diagnostic potential of OCT imaging, the research team, led by Nicusor Iftimia from Physical Sciences, used OCT to examine surgically removed pancreatic tissue samples from patients with cystic lesions. By identifying unique features of the high-risk cysts that appeared in the OCT scans, the team developed a set of visual criteria to differentiate between low- and high-risk cysts. They then tested the criteria by comparing OCT diagnoses to those obtained by examining thin slices of the pancreatic tissue under a microscope. Their results showed that OCT allowed clinicians to reliably differentiate between low- and high-risk cysts with a success rate close to that achieved by microscope-assisted examinations of slices of the same samples.

Future studies by the research team will focus on improving imaging resolution to further differentiate between solid lesions and autoimmune pancreatitis, and test this technology in-vivo. They recently received FDA approval for testing this technology in human patients by using an OCT probe small enough to be inserted into the pancreas through a biopsy needle, which will be guided into suspect masses in the pancreas by endoscopic ultrasound imaging. A pilot clinical study is planned to start within the next couple of months. If in-vivo data will prove reliable differentiation between the two types of cysts, a study in a larger number of patients will be planned, contingent on NIH funding and FDA approval.

Full results of the work have been published in the August issue of Biomedical Optics Express.

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