Nonlinear microscopy pro exposes strengths and limits of various techniques

APRIL 7, 2009--A webcast scheduled for broadcast tomorrow, April 8, (and available afterward as a recording) will discuss and compare the powerful nonlinear optical microscopy methods making their way into life science laboratories around the world. Among the techniques planned for discussion are multiphoton microscopy, second and third harmonic imaging, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) microscopy.

APRIL 7, 2009--A webcast scheduled for broadcast tomorrow, April 8, (and available afterward for on-demand viewing or listening) will discuss and compare the powerful nonlinear optical microscopy methods making their way into life science laboratories around the world. Among the techniques planned for discussion are multiphoton microscopy, second and third harmonic imaging, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) microscopy.

Produced by BioOptics World, the program, titled Success with advanced microscopy, will feature John Girkin, Ph.D., Professor of Biophysics at Durham University (England) as guest speaker. He will begin by describing practical applications wherein these methods have enabled biological research that was not previously possible.

Dr. Girkin will also review and discuss the current limitations of two-photon microscopy and the other techniques, and explain some of the work being done to overcome these barriers. In particular, he will explore approaches and technologies--including adaptive optics methods, micro-mirror scanning, and miniature optics--that researchers are developing to enable greater imaging depth without disturbing the sample.

For those wondering where the core technology might go next in its application to real-life science challenges, the presentation will conclude with an exploration of likely future directions.

Throughout the one-hour program, Dr. Girkin will engage with attendees, answering questions as they come up. In addition, time will be dedicated at the end to questions and answers.

Dr. Girkin's main research interest is in developing and applying photonics technology to challenges set in the life sciences. His recent work has centered on advanced optical microscopy with a focus on non-linear methods and the application of adaptive optics to improve imaging at depth in living samples.

The program, "Success with advanced microscopy--From multiphoton to second-harmonics: comparing nonlinear bio-imaging methods," will take place Wednesday, April 8, 2009 at 1:00 ET and will be recorded both with and without visual content. So, it will be available as an on-demand webcast and podcast.

The program is available for registration now on the BioOptics World site. It is made possible by Carl Zeiss MicroImaging.

Posted by Barbara G. Goode, barbarag@pennwell.com, for BioOptics World.

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