Yokogawa, Carl Zeiss partner on international sales of confocal scanner unit

OCTOBER 3, 2008 -- Yokogawa Electric (Tokyo, Japan) says high-performance microscope giant Carl Zeiss Group, will sell the Yokogawa CSU-X1 confocal scanner unit in all markets outside Japan. Zeiss will incorporate the CSU-X1 into its Cell Observer SD confocal microscope system; sales will begin next month and will target living cell research for medicine, molecular biology, and related applications.

OCTOBER 3, 2008 -- Yokogawa Electric Corp. (Tokyo, Japan) says the Carl ZeissGroup, the world's largest producer of high-performance microscopes, will sell the Yokogawa CSU-X1 confocal scanner unit in all markets outside Japan. Carl Zeiss will incorporate the CSU-X1 into its Cell Observer SD confocal microscope system. Sales are planned to begin in November 2008 and will target medical and biological research applications involving the observation of live cells (e.g., blood cells, cancer cells, and T cells).

Since launching the CSU series in 1996, Yokogawa has delivered more than 1,400 units all over the world, and the company says this system now enjoys the top share of the live cell imaging market.

According to Yokogawa, remarkable progress in molecular biology has led to a need in the medical and biology fields to better understand the physiological functions of live cells. Conventional light microscopes cannot be used to observe reactions in live cells because the cells need to be ground or cut, says the company. But, it says, with the CSU series' ability to continuously change the focal plane, no advance processing is necessary and it can be used to observe live cells and other three-dimensional objects.

By incorporating the market leading CSU-X1, Carl Zeiss will be able to extend the range of applications for its confocal microscope system. For Yokogawa, sales of the CSU-X1 will be boosted through the brand, sales network, and service network of the Carl Zeiss Group.

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Yokogawa CSU-X1 confocal scanner unit

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