"Smart light engines" available to bioanalytical instrument manufacturers, researchers for Beta testing

June 27, 2008 -- Lumencor (Beaverton, OR), a biotechnology company developing lighting solutions for the life sciences, says that its new generation of lighting for biotech is available for Beta testing at select labs in the US and Europe. The "smart light engines,' designed to replace traditional sources, target manufacturers of bioanalytical instruments and scientists involved in advanced research and diagnostic testing.

June 27, 2008 -- Lumencor (Beaverton, OR), a biotechnology company developing lighting solutions for the life sciences, says that its new generation of lighting for biotech -- "smart light engines for bioanalysis" -- is available for Beta testing at select labs in the US and Europe. The light engines, designed to replace traditional light sources, target manufacturers developing bioanalytical instruments and scientists involved in advanced research and diagnostic testing.

According to Steven Jaffe, Ph.D., Lumencor CEO and founder, "Researchers are placing greater demand on their analytical equipment for increasingly sensitive and specific analyses. They are designing smaller, more mobile analytical instruments with flexible, high performance light sources."

The offering aims to overcome shortcomings of more traditional light source solutions. The company says that Ideally, a bioanalytical light source should provide easy modulation, switching between colors and among light intensities. It should provide high power, spectral purity and stability, and be durable in order to support the most robust, quantitative analyses.

Lumencor's smart light engines promise all these attributes in addition to affordability. This, the company notes, enables opportunities for the design of more accurate and specific bioanalytical tools to advance today's research and development.

Applications include DNA sequencing, quantitative PCR, lab-a-chip technologies, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy for live cell imaging.

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