Microscopy method could offer more precise treatment for corneal disease

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Wellman Center for Photomedicine (Boston, MA) have developed a new microscopy technique that selectively stiffens tissue in the cornea and might one day offer improved treatment for eye problems caused by weakened corneal tissue. The technique works to strengthen the cornea by precisely crosslinking the collagen fibers that make up corneal tissue, and then measures tissue stiffness without disturbing untreated areas.

Related: Confocal microscopy method effective as diagnostic tool for sarcoidosis

Disease can cause the cornea, the clear dome-shaped layer that covers the front of the eye, to gradually weaken until pressure in the eye causes it to bulge and leads to vision problems. A corneal transplant may eventually be necessary as the condition, known as keratoconus, progresses. However, a new treatment called corneal crosslinking is showing promise for slowing or stopping the progression of keratoconus. The procedure is used in Europe, Canada, and Japan, and is undergoing clinical trials in the United States.
 
"Right now, ultraviolet light is used to perform crosslinking across the entire cornea," says Seok-Hyun Yun of the Massachusetts General Hospital Wellman Center for Photomedicine, who led the work. "However, this comes with a risk of damaging the innermost layer of the cornea, a complication that changes the corneal function and can cause it to become very hazy. There is also no way to predict whether the procedure will actually improve vision in a given patient."
 
For this reason, the researchers wanted to see if two-photon absorption could be used to precisely control the area of corneal crosslinking. Two-photon absorption uses a near-infrared femtosecond laser to achieve very high spatial resolution confined to a small volume. This approach has been used to harden liquid resins to create microscopic optical components and other 3D structures. Until this research, the technique had not been applied to stiffen tissue, which is initially solid, in a specific area.
 
To see if two-photon absorption could indeed induce crosslinking, the researchers used a home-built two-photon microscopy setup that delivers femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser light delivered through the objective lens. They placed a cornea sample under the objective lens, applied a light-sensitive dye to the tissue, and then turned on the laser light and focused it to a specific layer.
 
After some trial and error, they found that exposing the tissue to 200 mW laser light for 10 minutes induced collagen crosslinking without damaging tissue. By scanning the laser through an area of tissue, the researchers found they could induce crosslinking in a specific 3D area.
 
"If you can crosslink a specific part of the cornea, it might be possible to optimize the visual outcome," Yun says. "With two-photon absorption, we can selectively choose and limit the depth of crosslinking to avoid cell damage both on the top and bottom layers of the cornea."
 
One of the challenges, however, is verifying that crosslinking has taken place. The collagen crosslinking induced by two-photon absorption is not easily visualized with standard imaging methods. Thus, the researchers turned to a specialized technique called Brillouin microscopy, which Yun’s lab previously developed and has gradually improved. Brillouin microscopy offers a non-contact way to measure 3D biomechanical tissue properties with high spatial resolution.
 
"We used Brillouin microscopy to validate that we can induce crosslinking in tissue and showed that the amount of crosslinking produced with two-photon adsorption is almost the same as what can be induced with the single-photon approach used today," Yun says.
 
Because the two-photon approach induces crosslinking point by point, it is a lengthy process to perform, making it most useful for crosslinking a small region or a thin slice of tissue.
 
Although more studies are needed to understand how various patterns of crosslinking affect corneal shape and vision, the researchers hope that the new technique could allow crosslinking in a 3D pattern specific to a patient’s corneal bulging to maximize the benefits of the treatment.
 
Two-photon crosslinking might also be useful for tissue engineering applications, where it could be used to selectively modulate the stiffness of 3D cell cultures to more closely match that of tissue in the body, for example.
 
Full details of the work appear in the journal Optica; for more information, please visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/optica.3.000469.

Get All the BioOptics World News Delivered to Your Inbox

Subscribe to BioOptics World Magazine or email newsletter today at no cost and receive the latest news and information.

 Subscribe Now
Related Articles

Microscope detects one million-plus biomarkers for sepsis in 30 minutes

A microscope has the potential to simultaneously detect more than one million biomarkers for sepsis at the point of care.

Fluorescence microscopy helps provide new insight into how cancer cells metastasize

By using fluorescence microscopy, scientists have discovered an alternate theory on how some cancer cells metastasize.

Adaptive optics enhances super-resolution microscopy for cell imaging

A new ultra-high resolution nanoscope can take 3D images of an entire cell and its cellular constituents in unprecedented detail.

Fluorescence microscopy approach captures three views of a sample simultaneously

A new fluorescence microscopy approach improves image resolution by acquiring three views of a sample at the same time.

BLOGS

Neuro15 exhibitors meet exacting demands: Part 2

Increasingly, neuroscientists are working with researchers in disciplines such as chemistry and p...

Why be free?

A successful career contributed to keeping OpticalRayTracer—an optical design software program—fr...

LASER Munich 2015 is bio-bent

LASER World of Photonics 2015 included the European Conferences on Biomedical Optics among its si...

White Papers

Understanding Optical Filters

Optical filters can be used to attenuate or enhance an image, transmit or reflect specific wavele...

How can I find the right digital camera for my microscopy application?

Nowadays, image processing is found in a wide range of optical microscopy applications. Examples ...

CONNECT WITH US

            

Twitter- BioOptics World