Nanosecond laser therapy helps slow age-related macular degeneration

Seeking to find more effective laser therapy to slow down age-related macular generation (AMD), an ophthalmic condition that affects older adults and results in vision loss, researchers from the University of Melbourne in Australia have found that nanosecond laser therapy did not result in damage to the retina, the sensitive light-detecting tissue at the back of the eye.

Related: Adaptive optics visualizes, characterizes vascular disease early and noninvasively

Associate professor Erica Fletcher from the Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience says that their study was the first to detail how nanosecond laser treatment may improve eye health in those with AMD. In the early stages, the disease is characterized by the presence of small, fatty deposits called drusen and thickening in a membrane at the back of the eye.

The study explores how this laser may help in limiting retinal disease, showing that it improved the health of important supporting cells at the back of the eye. It also showed evidence that nanosecond laser treatment in one eye can also produce positive effects in the other untreated eye. This raises the possibility that monocular treatment may be sufficient to treat disease in both eyes.

Full details of the work appear in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology; for more information, please visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.14-262444.

(Thumbnail image via Shutterstock)

-----

Follow us on Twitter, 'like' us on Facebook, connect with us on Google+, and join our group on LinkedIn

Subscribe now to BioOptics World magazine; it's free!

 

Get All the BioOptics World News Delivered to Your Inbox

Subscribe to BioOptics World Magazine or email newsletter today at no cost and receive the latest news and information.

 Subscribe Now
Related Articles

Eye test that pairs two in vivo imaging methods may detect Parkinson's earlier

A low-cost, noninvasive eye test pairs two in vivo imaging methods to help detect Parkinson's before clinical symptoms appear.

Lightweight handheld probe for OCT provides insight into children's retinas

A handheld device is capable of capturing OCT images of a retina with cellular resolution in infants and toddlers.

NeuroVision receives $10M in financing for optical imaging device to detect Alzheimer's

NeuroVision Imaging has raised Series B financing for its optical imaging device to detect and monitor Alzheimer's disease early.  

Optical elastography method targets corneal disease, with implications for other eye diseases

Optical elastography could lead to more effective therapies for degenerative corneal disease and other eye diseases.

BLOGS

Neuro15 exhibitors meet exacting demands: Part 2

Increasingly, neuroscientists are working with researchers in disciplines such as chemistry and p...

Why be free?

A successful career contributed to keeping OpticalRayTracer—an optical design software program—fr...

LASER Munich 2015 is bio-bent

LASER World of Photonics 2015 included the European Conferences on Biomedical Optics among its si...

White Papers

Understanding Optical Filters

Optical filters can be used to attenuate or enhance an image, transmit or reflect specific wavele...

How can I find the right digital camera for my microscopy application?

Nowadays, image processing is found in a wide range of optical microscopy applications. Examples ...

CONNECT WITH US

            

Twitter- BioOptics World

Copyright © 2007-2016. PennWell Corporation, Tulsa, OK. All Rights Reserved.PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS