President Obama honors IBM scientists for laser technology that enables LASIK

Being honored for their work in designing, developing, and implementing excimer laser technology, including in LASIK eye surgery, IBM (NYSE:IBM; Armonk, NY) scientists James J. Wynne, Rangaswamy Srinivasan, and Samuel Blum are receiving the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Barack Obama. The award is the most prestigious of its kind in the US, and is given to leading innovators for technological achievement.

IBM’s work in laser technology, which began in 1981 by this team of scientists, has shaped the course of surgical care. Well suited for delicate surgeries such as LASIK, the excimer laser replaced mechanical instruments such as the scalpel, which was not very precise, could leave the cornea permanently weakened, and required a long recovery time.

The team of researchers originally demonstrated the technology’s capabilities to the medical community by using quick pulses of UV light to cut a clean pattern into a human hair without burning the strand. This ability to precisely cut into materials via vaporization, rather than burning, was appealing to doctors and patients, as it left surrounding areas undamaged.

President Obama will personally bestow the award to the three scientists at a special White House ceremony at a later date. IBM has earned the National Medal of Technology and Innovation on nine other occasions.

Wynne still works at IBM's TJ Watson Research Center, while Srinivasan and Blum have since retired.

-----

Follow us on Twitter, 'like' us on Facebook, and join our group on LinkedIn

Laser Focus World has gone mobile: Get all of the mobile-friendly options here.

Subscribe now to BioOptics World magazine; it's free!

POST A COMMENT

Related Articles

Synthetic, blue light-sensitive molecular switches can be utilized to control biochemical signaling processes in living cells

Blue LED light enables control of insulin secretion

An international team of researchers has incorporated a synthetic, blue light-sensitive molecular switch into a sulfonylurea compound—a class of drugs widely used to regulate blood glucose levels i...

Photodynamic therapy for deep cancer cells could get a boost with new nanoparticle

An international team of researchers has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy (PDT) to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to...

Biophotonics innovators amongst Edmund Optics' 2014 Education Award winners

Optical components maker Edmund Optics has named the recipients of its 2014 Educational Award program—an award given in recognition of outstanding undergraduate and graduate optics programs in scie...

Gold nanoparticles, laser light pair to measure mucus

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) have developed a way to use gold nanoparticles and laser light to measure the stickiness of the mucus that lines the airway.

BLOGS

BioOptics World editor-in-chief Barbara Goode

What is biophotonics?

At BioOptics World, our focus is photonics (including optics) for life sciences—that is, biophoto...

Nobel Prize honors super-resolution optical microscopy

"This year's prize is about how the optical microscope became a nanoscope," said Staffa...

High-res 3D optical: A tribute to Mats Gustafsson

Biologists will soon be able to see more in 3D, thanks to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HH...

Most Popular Articles


CONNECT WITH US

            

Twitter- BioOptics World

Copyright © 2007-2014. PennWell Corporation, Tulsa, OK. All Rights Reserved.PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS