Software-driven fluorescence microscopy visualizes neuron activity

Seeking to understand how nerve cells contact each other to transmit information and which proteins and mechanisms control the formation and function of these synaptic contacts, researchers at the University of Münster (Münster, Germany) have shown that the loss of the protein neurobeachin (Nbea) not only disrupts signaling within the neuron, but also leads to reduced numbers of spines (actin-rich dendritic protrusions) and the mislocalization of another common spine protein, synaptopodin. The team accomplished this using fluorescence microscopy driven by image analysis software (Bitplane's Imaris software).

Dendrites transfected with DsRed for visualization of morphology and with PSD-95 (green) for visualizing postsynaptic densities
Dendrites transfected with DsRed for visualization of morphology and with PSD-95 (green) for visualizing postsynaptic densities. (Image courtesy of Bitplane/University of Münster)

Led by Professor Markus Missler, Katharina Niesmann, Ph.D., used cultured primary nerve cells from the hippocampus of mouse brains. Then, multicolor labeling followed by observation under epifluorescence and confocal light microscopy enabled the team to study the differentiation of synapses between these cells and observe the effect of Nbea.

The research results have been published in Nature Communications—for more information, please visit http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v2/n11/full/ncomms1565.html.

-----

Follow us on Twitter, 'like' us on Facebook, and join our group on LinkedIn

Follow OptoIQ on your iPhone; download the free app here.

Subscribe now to BioOptics World magazine; it's free!

Get All the BioOptics World News Delivered to Your Inbox

Subscribe to BioOptics World Magazine or email newsletter today at no cost and receive the latest news and information.

 Subscribe Now
Related Articles

New super-resolution imaging technique is low-cost for universities

A new, low-cost technique can capture super-resolution images of biological structures such as viruses and nanoparticles.

Two-photon microscopy images touch-sensitive sensory receptors in mouse fingertips

Using two-photon microscopy may help to understand the mechanism of mechanoreceptor function.

Method builds on super-resolution microscopy to image collagen fibrils in-network

Super-resolution images of structures in biological material under natural conditions at a much higher resolution is possible.

Blood becomes a laser emitter for drug testing, cancer treatment

Combining laser light with an FDA-approved green fluorescent dye can monitor cell structure and activity at the molecular level.

BLOGS

Neuro15 exhibitors meet exacting demands: Part 2

Increasingly, neuroscientists are working with researchers in disciplines such as chemistry and p...

Why be free?

A successful career contributed to keeping OpticalRayTracer—an optical design software program—fr...

LASER Munich 2015 is bio-bent

LASER World of Photonics 2015 included the European Conferences on Biomedical Optics among its si...

White Papers

Understanding Optical Filters

Optical filters can be used to attenuate or enhance an image, transmit or reflect specific wavele...

How can I find the right digital camera for my microscopy application?

Nowadays, image processing is found in a wide range of optical microscopy applications. Examples ...

CONNECT WITH US

            

Twitter- BioOptics World

Copyright © 2007-2016. PennWell Corporation, Tulsa, OK. All Rights Reserved.PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS AND CONDITIONS